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them. >> rose: we close this evening with a conversation about the global economy with india's minister of finance. >> you see, we require massive investment to build our country. the bulk of it comes from domestic savings but we still require at a margin, foreign investment, for that brings technology. that brings invasion, that brings better management skills and management management practices. it opens new markets for us. it introduces us to new products. that is the advantage of getting fdi. >> the texas explosion,s bots to-- boston investigation and the global economy when we continue. >> rose: funding for charlie rose was provided by the following:. >> rose: additional funding provided by these funders. and by bloomberg provider of multimedia news and information services worldwide. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. . >> rose: we begin this evening with the explosion at a fertilizer plant in west texas which is near waco. here is the explosion which took place last night. at last count five people have died and mo
from what country? india. thousands of years ago and hundreds of years ago in india there were no movie theatres, no television, no radio, no comic books or no books for people like you and me to read. was this the same here? >> yes. all offer the world it was like that. ask your parents. they can tell you what it was like before the internet. so, people told stores. i bet you tell stories. did you tell a story today? >> yeah, i bet you did you went up to our friend and said, did you see that? your friend said, no, no he didn't. right? that's a story. so, i will tell you a story. in india, here we have super heroes like, tell me a hero. >> super man. we have super heroes in india. krishna. lifts mountains and throws them to the ocean to create bridges. i will tell you the story about a super hero. krishna as a little boy in the village where the trees blow and the water flows and the birds fly and the grass grows, in this village there are cows. and people and they go to the river and they go to get their water. and they go to the river and what do they see? an evil demon is pollutin
with both sides standing to gain a lot. >> it sure is. germany wants access to india's middle class and india wants expertise in renewable energy. >> they are expected to sign a number of far-reaching trade deals. >> the atmosphere at the german-indian cabinet session was cordial. but there are still sticking points in the negotiations for a free-trade agreement between india and europe. they are concerned the country's economy could be overpowered by the economic might of the e.u. but offered words of encouragement. >> it is germany's experience again and again the volume of trade increases each time a free-trade agreement is reached. >> germany is india's biggest trading partner in the e.u. and exports have grown steadily. imports from india were about the same value. that was an increase of nearly 20% over the year before. the indian government says that it is concerned about the debt crisis and its effect on the global economy. >> a strong euro zone is in the interest of all of the countries. we want the trading system to remain strong. >> from the german side there are question
commission is investigating crimes committed during the regime. no patent for novartis. india possibly in court has dismissed the patent protection plea for its cancer drug, greenback -- glivec. >> it is a serious blow not just for novartis, but for other western firms as well. they have been focusing on india to drive sales at a time when the global climate is not as rewarding. >> the ruling is a win worldwide for patients and dramatic -- genetic drugmakers. >> india had one word for novartis -- no. judges would not let them take out patrons for -- patents for old drugs with new tweaks. bad news for novartis. >> patents will only be granted for genuine inventions. >> it is a victory for protesters like these, who say pharmaceutical patent's -- patents cost lives. novartis's medication cost around 1700 euros per month. many, if -- for many, it is generic medication or none at all. in a radio interview, the company's chief of corporate research can't be ruling a setback for research and for india. -- called the ruling a setback for research and for india. >> for novartis, in means we pr
>>> coming up, a report from india, it's officially illegal, but many indian families still manage to seeto it, that they have more boys than girls. >>> also, activist jim wallace on overcoming the country's problems by serving the common good. >>> and for this family, no computers, no cell phones, no errands, no work -- judy vallenti on keeping the sabbath. >> announcer: major funding for "religion and ethics news weekly" is provided by the lily endowment, an indianapolis-based privateami foundation dedicated to its founders' interests in religion, community development and education. additional funding also provided by mutual of america, designing customized, individual and group retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. and the corporation for public broadcasting. >>> welcome, i'm bob abernathy, it's good to have you with us. president obama hosted the annual easter prayer brkfa at the whithouse friday, nearly a week after western christians celebrated the holiday. leaders from many christian traditions attended. the president called easter a time to remembe
things like mull allah, the savage rape in india, these stories have really, really brought people out on to the streets. i think it's a combination of social media, a combination of just a climax in a sense of women beginning to kind of become more and more empowered globally. and the question is, is this now going to start to really change cultures for the better. and if not, how can we reinforce that movement forward. so that is really-- . >> rose: what do you think is necessary to make sure that this sort of, that the climate changes? what has to happen? >> well, firstly i think what we do at the summit is tell stories. and telling the stories is the first act in changing things. because people don't respond to issues, women's issues. they respond as we see can mullala and the rape, true story, if you can tell those stories, create the excitement and the fascination and the outrage in a sense about those individual stories, you do create a window for which people can go through. and the important thing is, of course, when those windows of real interest happen, like with the rape st
rose and prospered, and then many nations in southeast asia rose and prospered, and now china and india rise and prosper. all of this has been welcomed by the united states. in none of this was a foregone conclusion when you consider where the asia-pacific region was at the end of world war ii. while the asian political and economic miracle was realized first and foremost by the hard work and talent of the asian people, it was enabled by the enduring principles that the u.s. has stood for in the region, which we believe are essential to peace, prosperity, and security. these include a commitment to free and open commerce, of just international order of rights and responsibilities of nation, and fidelity to the rule of law, open access by all to the domains of sea, air, space, and now cyberspace, and the principle of resolving conflict without the use of force. it was also enabled, and this is the theme of my remarks today, by the pivotal role of u.s. military power and presence in the region. we believe are strong security presence in asia pacific has provided a critical foundation for
, yangon. >>> india's supreme court has made a landmark decision that has major implications for both the pharmaceutical industry and the world's poor patients. the court rejected a swiss firm's attempt to win patent protection for its cancer drug. in the ruling handed down on monday, the court says the compound made by novartis is not novel enough to qualify for a patent. the company filed the case seven years ago. india has stricter pharmaceutical patent requirements than other nations. for example, it doesn't allow patents for tweaks to existing drugs. this common industry practice is -- india a major producer of copycat drugs which mimic branded products. it also makes generic medicines which are based on expired patents. indian-made alternatives can cost less than 10% the price of branded drugs. health officials believe that more than alf of the aids drugs used in developing nations come from india. aid groups are applauding the court decision saying it protects the right of the poor to medical treatment. >> i think the supreme court said they definitely abuse this practice of ge
. >> there are interests to protect them. india has become a leader in copying drugs, generating billions in profit, but they will be losing future research and development if these are not protected. it is not very strong. whether it is global or national. >> it is the rest of versus the west, and for this time, they have one, the the dispute is far from over. millions of patients depend on cheap copies of western drugs manufactured in india. had the decision gone the other way, they say their lifeline would have been cut. but who is going to pay for the research around these treatments in the first place? but critics say drug companies to often ignore the poor and only look for cure is to the diseases of the wealthy. they say the cheap drugs help to fill this gap. bbc news. >> so what does this ruling mean for drug companies around the world? a senior fellow at project hope, a group providing health care around the globe. is it true what the drug companies say, that research and development into new drugs will and if this happens? >> it will not end. the question is whether it will slow down. the
," as traders like to say. thanks for helping us out today. > > sure. india's supreme court ruling that denied drug giant novartis from extending patents on a cancer treatment is seen as a victory for impoverished patients who'll just barely afford generic versions of the drug that'll be made. our cover story examines patents versus generics elsewhere and what it means to the global trillion- dollar pie big pharama hopes to devour. the u.s. still spends more on meds than any other nation, but emerging markets with rising per capita incomes such as india, china, brazil and more than a dozen others are growing faster. "as much as 30% of the growth could be there." that's one reason why swiss- drug maker novartis fought to extend patents in india on its improved cancer-treatment gleevec. novartis claimed it had made the drug more effective and thus warrented a new patent. india's supreme court disagreed. the ruling allows indian companies to make copycat versions. "if the drug companies aren't able to have patent protection, maybe not in every country but in most countries, they're not going to b
not exactly achieved what lawmakers wanted. >> he came to germany from india. as a nurse, he was a welcome addition to the workforce because germany has a shortage of medical professionals. getting qualifications recognized was no problem under the new law, leaving time to settle in and did the new -- leaving time to settle in. >> when i first came to germany, i could not speak the language. then i did a four-month intensive language course and at the same time did an internship here. >> it is the kind of success story the government wants to see more of. critics point out that far fewer people than expected have made use of the qualifications recognition scheme. the minister says the numbers will improve. >> i think 30,000 is a very good beginning for a law that is one year old, and we are doing more to promote this, so word should spread even further. >> germany needs hundreds of thousands of skilled workers, and the government and business are trying to recruit them from all over the world. applicants need to have up-to- date qualifications and be ready to immediately start working. >>
cambodians travel home at this time. >>> india may be big, but it doesn't have a big soccer of following. it's ranked only 143rd, by fifa. but with the professional soccer league kicking off there seven years ago the sport has been gaining popularity. nhk has more. >> reporter: one japanese player active in the indian professional soccer league. he is 33 and is a strieker. although cricket has been the most popular sport in india, there have been some changes in the last few years. the popularity of soccer has been driving, mainly among young people. after live broadcast of soccer games became more common, more people are getting into the sport. this is a professional football league. and more than 2,000 spectators are here. i league, the country's professional soccer league was founded seven years ago. there are total of 40 teams in its two divisions, holding games right across the country. he first came to india in 2009. and it's a sport season here this year. after playing in the j league in japan, he played for teams in singapore and thailand, but he didn't have much success. he thought
of the of unanswered questions of the rest of this century as to whether countries like china and india can sustain their growth and emerge as a true global economic powers. much of that depends on what happens with women and girls. now, none of these are coincidences, but instead, they demonstrate -- and your presence here today confirms -- that we are meeting at a remarkable moment of confluence. because in countries and communities across the globe where, for generations, violence against women has gone unchecked, opportunity and dignity virtually unknown, there is a powerful new current, a grass-roots activism stirring. galvanized by events too outrageous to ignore, and enable by new technologies that give women and girls voices like never before. [applause] that is why it we need to seize this moment, but we need to be thoughtful and smart and savvy about what this moment really offers to us. many of us have been working, advocating, and fighting for women and girls more decades and we care to remember. i think we can and should be proud of what we have achieved. conferences like this have bee
to dance at four. david average age in china is 26 and in india is 36. maybe a slower growth, but long-term and a lot of opportunities. a lot of back to the is -- a lot of activity in seoul area. they have an election next year in india. things slowed down before federal elections. no one has ever heard of that in our country, but sometimes things slowed down a little bit before the election. you will hear from denny rodrick about a lot of nuclear opportunity as countries look at energy security and reducing their carbon foot rent. another of interesting factors in that. i heard that he talks about the balance return market and -- about the market and the state. those are some of the things i picked up yesterday. last evening, we signed an agreement with a council. we signed a memorandum of understanding. i was just there. we signed an agreement to provide financing for up to 5 billion dollars. it depends on the industry. a lot of infrastructure in dubai. power, water. it is our fourth largest country of exposure globally. number four, right after india. india is coming up fast. a lot
and nails and that was deployed in india and pakistan? >> it has been used before. and al qaeda has talked about that. but it's also a widely available bomb-making instructions on the internet. and it's been used by nonal qaeda groups, as well. i certainly don't want to rule out an al qaeda-inspired plot here. i just don't think that it points enough in that direction that we should rule out the other possibilities of some sort of domestic terrorism. >> mr. forest, the boston police have labeled this the most complex crime boston has ever had. why is that? how do you read that? what are they telling us? >> well, the scene is simply massive, a 12 block square area with cars. so it's taking them a long time to collect the data they need, the proverbial dots so they can look at all of those dots, all of that video, all of the physical evidence, all of the intelligence reporting, and start to slowly piece that together. it's an enormous task which is still going to take really days, not just hours. >> mr. lighter, can i just come back to this finish line? there was a grandstand. you had to hav
you about who say they're paying protection money to the cartel. india's supreme court has issued a landmark ruling over the issue of generic drugs. --lo losses the cancer drug being laws are challenged. nba can continue producing cheaper medicines for people that need them. many generics drugs and markets them in south america and africa. it is a leading market contender when it comes to that. having this judgment go in favor of the indian pharmaceutical companies will raise questions about whether western pharmaceutical companies will want to sell original products in india for fear of being copied. whether there is a happy medium where western pharmaceutical companies could work with indian companies to make a cheaper product that both benefit from financially. it is now in the realm of the international lawyers and the world trade organization who have been watching this case carefully. expect an appeal against the decision. for the moment, indian pharmaceutical companies have gotten a valuable victory in the supreme court. cancer sufferers across the globe can breathe a sigh
by the government to -- both at home and to the world. nhk world. >>> india's supreme court has made a landmark decision that has major implications for the pharmaceutical industry. in the ruling handed down on monday, the court says the compound made by novartis is not novel enough to qualify for a patent. the company filed the case seven years ago. india has it stricter pharmaceutical patent requirements than other nations. for example it doesn't allow patents for twaeks to existing drugs. this practice is known as evergreening. india is a major producer of copycat drugs which mimic branded products. it also makes generic medicines which are based on expired patents. indian made drugs can be more than 10% less than branned products. aid groups are applauding it saying it protects the right of the poor to medical treatment. >> i think the supreme court has protected the practice. >> but the company's growing drug industry is raising concerns. anlists point out that cheap alternatives from india could make it difficult for pharmaceutical companies to continue the expensi
women in india is taking a toll on the country's tourism industry. the incredible india advertising campaign presents the country as an ideal destination for foreign tourists. but their numbers have slumped in the three months since a highly publicized rape case. a new survey reveals that the overall number of foreign tourists arrivals has fallen 25% in the past quarter, compared with the same period last year. the sharpest drop was seen in the number of female tourists, which decreased 35%. the study was conducted by the associated chambers of commerce and industry of india. following the widely reported gang rape of a university student, at least two attacks on foreign tourists have been reported. the indian government has made efforts to toughen rape laws, but the spate of new reports has led to public outcry, and a demand for greater security for women. the recent study says travelers who had been planning trips to india had opted for other asian countries, such as malaysia, thailand, or indonesia. the survey results come as a blow to india, where the tourism industry is a key e
league. soaka, 33, is a striker. although cricket has been the most popular sport in india, there have been some changes in the last few years. the popularity of soccer has been driving, mainly among young people. after live broadcast of soccer games became more common, more people are getting into the sport. this is a professional football league. and more than 2,000 spectators are here. i league, the country's professional soccer league was founded seven years ago. there are total of 40 teams in its two divisions, holding games right across the country. s soaka first came to india in 2009. and it's a sport season here this year. after playing in the j league in japan, he played for teams in singapore and thailand, but he didn't have much success. he thought about retiring but finally came to india to try his luck. he did well in both offense and je defense. and to years ago was awarded the mvp of the year. >> translator: i came to india as an overseas recruit. so i really want to get results. >> reporter: his team, most of the players are young, without a lot of experience. so he's e
use the death penalty. it is legal in china and some parts of the united states. india and japan have resumed executions after abandoning the practice for some time. human rights activists are calling it a disappointing setback. several countries are once again using the death penalty. in india, mass protests following a high-profile rape case last year at parliament to approve the death penalty for rape cases where the victim dies -- last year lead parliament -- last year led parliament to approve the death penalty for rape cases where the victim dies. >> said he after study shows that the death penalty does not bring down the number -- study after study shows that the death penalty does not bring down the number of cases. >> china carried out, by far, the most death penalty cases. iran is next with 300 14 executions. a rack with 129. saudi arabia with -- it ran is next with 314 executions -- iran is next with 300 14 executions. iraq with 129. >> amnesty international is calling on the government to institute a moratorium on the use of the death penalty. the first step continues to b
it under wraps. >> jon: smart move, my friend. and you're heading off now, you're going to india. >> india. >> jon: with assif mandvi. assif mandvi and jon hamm are going to india ( cheering ) to shoot-- you're going to live in an ashram. >> we're actually getting married. ( laughter ) >> jon: it would be nice. the couldn't happen to two better people. >> i know! it's an exciting film based on a true story about an agent who goes to india to try find two cricket players who can play baseball. it's a true story. one of the guys is still in the major lesion at a triple a level. they found two kid, expaen 17, took them out of india. they didn't speak any exwhrsh. they never played baseball but they had the raw tools -- >> they could bring a 90-mile-per-hour fastball. >> yes, but it's a very different-- you were a big cricket guy back in high school. >> jon: oh, huge! >> if there's one thing i know about jersey it's cricket crazy. ( laughter ) gli could eat 10 of them at one sitting. >> absolutely. wait a minute! >> jon: that's the jersey thing. are you a baseball guy, a baseball fan? >> i
of the birth of india. >> yeah, it's about india dos something which america did a little earlier which is kicking british out. >> jon: sure. we all get there at some point, except canada. >> but for the most part, it's like the india we make of american independence. but it's about these boys born at that moment. and it is about that generation. and these boys get swapped at birth by a sort of-- mislead midwife and they get, they sort of have each other's life. the rich one has the poor life and the poor one has the rich life. and then they oddly sort of confront each other at the end. >> jon: it is so much too-- they symbolize not just the birth of india but also its painful partitions, the wars that are fought. there is an awful lot of historical context to it. >> fortunately, you know, i mean yeah, but i didn't want to -- didon't think anybody needs to study before they see the film. because really it is about-- . >> jon: by the way that is a smart pitch. >> just saying, it's okayment we tell you what you need to know. >> jon: seriously, just tell them it is a tig never a boat, they
in just a couple of minutes. >>> india is saying investors his country is open for business. we'll bring you the interview on cnbc coming up. >>> and campaigning officially gets under way in italy. we'll bring you analysis on that situation about 11:20 central european time. >>> and the u.s. auto sector isn't shifting into overdrive. march sales are expected to jump. it could be the fifth straight month of strong sales figures. we'll preview that about 11:30 cet. worldwide@cnbc.com. a long weekend and i forget the e-mail address. just tragic. tweet us. and i remember that one. it's at cnbcwex. @kellyevans. >>> cyprus has had the terms of its bailout softened. it will now have until 2017 to meet a budget surplus target. a government spokesperson said they hope to extend that deadline to 2018. meanwhile, the president has extended a -- to revive the economy. over the weekend, it was decided those with over 100,000 euros in banks would lose 60% of their savings. laiki branches taking control of nearly 270 million pounds of deposits. the move comes after laiki was liquidated as part of the b
countries like china and india can sustain their growth and emerge as a true global economic powers. much of that depends on what happens with women and girls. now, none of these are coincidences, but instead, they demonstrate -- and your presence here today confirms -- that we are meeting at a remarkable moment of confluence. because in countries and communities across the globe where, for generations, violence against women has gone unchecked, opportunity and dignity virtually unknown, there is a powerful new current, a grass-roots activism stirring. galvanized by events too outrageous to ignore, and enable by new technologies that give women and girls voices like never before. [applause] that is why it we need to seize this moment, but we need to be thoughtful and smart and savvy about what this moment really offers to us. many of us have been working, advocating, and fighting for women and girls more decades and we care to remember. i think we can and should be proud of what we have achieved. conferences like this have been part of that progress. but let's recognize much of our advoca
in india is taking a toll on the country's tourism. the incredible india advertising campaign presents a destination for tourists but the numbers have slumped since a highly pub decides rape in december. it has fallen 25% in the past quarter compared with the same period last year. the sharpest drop was seen in the number of female tourists which decreased 35%. the study was conducteded by the associated chambers of commerce and industry of india. following a widely reported gang rape on a university student at least two attacks on foreign tourists have been reported. the government have made efforts on stronger rape laws but the out-cry is affecting them. and the survey results come as a blow to india where the tourism industry is a key earner in a period of lagging economic growth. >>> one of the most celebrated images in art history is reaching a new audience. this is a reproduction of monk's screen. a japanese scup tour made it for people who are visually impaired. he hopes that it will help. >> reporter: this sight impaired woman touches a painting by leonardo da vinci. she had kn
in congress this morning. >> another building collapse, this time in india, the danger this time in india, the danger happening right now for hospitag to give a breast cancer survivor a lifetime-- that's definitely a fair trade. whoo! you walk with friends, you meet new friends, and you keep those friendships. it was such a beautiful experience. (woman) ♪ and it's beautiful ♪ undeniable (woman) why walk 60 miles in the boldest breast cancer event in history? because everyone deserves a lifetime. visit the3day.org to register or to request more information today. ♪ burning like a fire ♪ building up from deep inside it was 3 days of pure joy. susan g. komen's investments in early detection and treatment have helped reduce breast cancer mortality in the u.s. by 33% since 1990. help us continue serving the millions of women and men with breast cancer who still need us every day. register for the 3-day now. (woman) it's just been an amazing, amazing journey. i love these people. ♪ and it's beautiful >> happening now in india, crews are trying to reach victims after a hospital roof co
always point to india and china. they account for over half of gold demand now, and they are driven by economic expansion, albeit maybe not at the 8%, but the reasons for buying gold are varied around the world. and that we see as a short-term price pullback. >> the two commis you just mentioned, china and india, india has the wedding season coming up, i suppose, so there will be more buying associated with that, but both of those commis are not has thriving. how important will it be for the price of gold for those economies to get kick started again? >> sure. i think it's important to understand that gold purchases in india and china, in addition to the wedding season and festivals, it is a fundamental asset to them. so it's not necessarily a fashion purchase or a luxury item. it is something that they buy that they understand and have for generations that gold is the foundation of long-term wealth creation. so despite the fact that they are slowing down somewhat, we need to understand that there is a long-term wealth creation engine here, which is creating increasing discretionary
an unlikely source. an emerging markets business titan. ratan tata ran india's biggest conglomerate and how businesses should live by a moral code. >>> i grew up admiring margaret thatcher. it was obvious to many of us in india in 1970s that economics didn't work and her forms were the right course. privatize industry and deregulate have largely been vindicated by history, but that doesn't tell us very much about what to do today. consider the world in 1979 when thatcher came to power. the average britain's life was a series of interactions with government. telephone, gas, electricity, water service, ports, trains, airlines were all owned and run by the state. as was steel companies and even jaguar and rolls royce. in almost all cases this led to inefficiency. it took months to just get a home telephone line installed. marginal tax rates were ferociously high. reaching up to 83%. britain was not unusual in most european countries. the state had a large roll amid the demanding of the country. even america had tax rates in the 1970s in the range of 70%. and government tightly regulated commun
for the death penalty in colorado; the campaign against domestic violence in india; the state of the voucher movement; and facebook turning red. but first, the other news of the day, here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: a southwest virginia interstate reopened today after a massive pileup killed three people and injured dozens more. yesterday police officials said dense fog triggered 17 separate crashes along i-77 yesterday, all within the span of a mile. the chain reaction involved 95 vehicles in a notoriously foggy mountainous area near the north carolina border. the top court in india rejected a patent application from a swiss drug maker for a major cancer drug. the ruling means indian makers of generic drugs can keep on making copycat versions of the novartis drug in question, gleevec. it's been highly effective in treating some forms of leukemia. the decision sets a benchmark for intellectual property cases in india. novartis responded to today's decision by saying it will not invest in drug research there. calm returned to the streets of kisumu, kenya, today after a weekend of heav
in the movie theater massacre. >> warner: from india, fred de sam lazaro reports on efforts to tackle violence against women, after the gang rape and murder of a medical student last year. >> any woman is subject to some kind of punishment. the men don't see it as harassment. >> woodruff: hari sreenivasan examines the case r an against using public money to help pay for private schools. plus, on the "daily download," the conversation about same sex marriage turns facebook red. >> it raises the visibility, i think, in a way that we haven't seen and probably energizes those who feel like this is the moment that gay marriage is finally getting cultural acceptance. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> more than two years ago th people of b. madecommment to the gulf. every day since we've worked hard to keep it. today the beaches and gulf are open for everyone to enjoy. we shared what we've learned so we can all produce energy more safely. b.p. is also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more
global warming, i'll explain. >>> morgan stanley predicted that china, india, brazil and russia will all slow down. check, check, check, check. so, what does he say about america's prospects? >>> then, we'll talk to the great historian ian morris. we'll take you all the way from the ice age to the far distant future. >>> first, here's my take. time for the fat and thin envelopes. the annual ritual when colleges send out admission and rejection notices to well over a million high school seniors. american higher education remains the envy of the world and it has been the nation's greatest path to social and economic mobility. sorting and rewarding talented kids from any and all backgrounds. but there are broad changes taking place at american universities that are moving them away from an emphasis on merit and achievement and towards offering a privileged experience for an already privileged group. state universities, once the highway of advancement for the middle class, have been utterly transformed in recent decades under the pressure of rising costs and falling government support. a new
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 734 (some duplicates have been removed)

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